support (800) 211-6155 SALES / (800) 505-VOIP SUPPORT
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

Different Fiber Optic Internet Speed Rates

fiber internet speed
Posted on Oct 27, 2021

A Comparison of Different Fiber Speeds!

Speed is everything, especially when it comes to fiber optic internet. Imagine this: you’re using the internet at home and then your friend says “Hey dude, I have a faster internet connection than you!” Immediately you are overtaken by feelings of inadequacy as you wonder how he got so lucky. Then you ask yourself, “What’s the internet speed I have at home?” and you call your ISP to find out how fast your connection is. It turns out that you have an average connection speed of 40 Mbps. You feel a little better but still think, “If he has 100 Mbps and I only have 40 Mbps it must be because his internet is better than mine.” The truth is that having a faster connection speed does not necessarily mean you have the best internet, and it’s possible for someone to have a much lower internet speed than you and still be using a better internet connection.

 

fiber optic internet speed

 how fast does my internet need to be?

That depends on what you want to use it for! If all you want to do is watch YouTube videos or Netflix, then having 100 Mbps will definitely not make your life any better. However, if you’re streaming 4K video or playing online games, then it might be worth shelling out some extra money for a fiber optic internet connection with higher speeds. Fiber is especially good for gamers because of the lightning fast speeds that most fiber providers offer, and since gaming requires tons of data to be transferred in real time, it’s almost impossible to play without a super-fast internet connection. If you’re still not sure whether you need a faster internet connection, Nordfiber has an easy-to-use speed test that will tell you how fast your internet is. It’s quick and easy so there’s no reason not to try it!

Now let’s say a little bit about the different types of internet speeds out there.

Fiber internet speed guide

Speed is everything, especially when it comes to fiber optic internet. Imagine this: you’re using the internet at home and then your friend says “Hey dude, I have a faster internet connection than you!” Immediately you are overtaken by feelings of inadequacy as you wonder how he got so lucky. Then you ask yourself, “What’s the internet speed I have at home?” and you call your ISP to find out how fast your connection is. It turns out that you have an average connection speed of 40 Mbps. You feel a little better but still think, “If he has 100 Mbps and I only have 40 Mbps it must be because his internet is better than mine.” The truth is that having a faster connection speed does not necessarily mean you have the best internet, and it’s possible for someone to have a much lower internet speed than you and still be using a better internet connection. When most people think about an “internet connection,” they usually mean cable or DSL, but fiber optics is quickly becoming one of the most popular internet speeds out there today.

READ THIS   how does fiber internet work?

Types of Internet Speeds at Home

  • Cable-cable has become a household name in recent years, and for good reason. Cable internet uses cable lines that run into homes to deliver fast speeds. It’s generally considered “middle of the road” as far as internet speeds go and is a more affordable option than fiber optic. Cable internet has been around for a long time, and most people who stream Netflix or play video games on their computers prefer cable because of the convenience of having an ISP connection available right there at home without any installation fees. If you’re happy with your current ISP and don’t feel like your cable internet is too slow, then you’re probably fine to stick with cable. We recommend checking out the Nordfiber speed test if you’re interested in seeing how fast your current connection speed is.
  • DSL-DSL stands for Digital Subscriber Line and it’s another mid-level option that most people go for. It uses a phone line to transmit data from your home internet connection to an ISP. DSL speeds range from 500 Kbps to 50 Mbps, and the newest DSL connections are many times faster than those of a few years ago. In fact, one of our fiber optic providers offers speeds as high as 1 Gbps!
  • Fiber-Do you like spending money and hate having to wait? Then fiber internet is for you! Fiber optic connections use glass or plastic fibers to transmit data, and these cables typically run directly from the provider’s office into homes. Fiber internet can be incredibly fast even at low speeds, but unfortunately it’s usually pretty expensive. Luckily there are some good alternatives out there that are cheaper and can give you a potential speed of up to 1 Gbps! Fiber internet is especially good for gamers who need lightning fast speeds when playing online.

“Super high speed uploads.”-Many fiber optic providers offer super fast upload speeds, which means that uploading videos, photos, or other large files will happen very quickly with fiber internet. Fiber is also good for people who do a lot of online gaming, because it ensures that gamers don’t experience any lag or latency while they’re playing on their consoles or PCs.

Now let’s talk about the different types of speed promises out there so you know what to look out for. While we all want fast internet, sometimes it can be hard to tell whether the speeds you’re getting from you specific companiesr ISP is actually as fast as they claim.

READ THIS  Starlink vs Fiber: Which Is The Better Internet Type?

Types of Internet Speeds Promised by ISPs

The speeds listed next to each type of connection are rough estimates and not guaranteed speeds from a specific ISP.

Up to-This is a fairly standard speed promise and most ISPs will offer internet speeds “up to” a certain Mbps. The problem is that there are so many factors that can affect your home connection, so while you might be getting the exact Mbps promised by your ISP, you could also be receiving up to 30% less than that depending on what you’re doing, where you are, and what time it is.

  1. 10X-When providers promise “10x faster speeds,” this usually means that they’re promising to give 10 times the speed of a standard broadband connection (usually DSL or cable). In other words, if your ISP is telling you that you’ll get “10x the speeds,” but it’s only giving you 20 Mbps, then in reality you’re only getting 2 Mbps. This can be a little misleading and we recommend checking out our Nordfiber speed test so that you stay informed about what your connection is actually doing.
  2. “Unlimited”-An ISP promising “unlimited” internet sounds good but you need to be careful. While it’s nice that they’re being so generous, “unlimited” really just means that there are no data caps. Most ISP’s have a data cap of several terabytes per month, which is usually more than enough for the average person, but if you stream movies online 24/7 or have 20 people using your connection every day, you might get pushed over that limit.
  3. “No speed cap”-If an ISP tells you that there are “no speed caps,” then that’s great! Keep in mind, that this doesn’t mean that there are no data limits-there probably are, but if they have a hard cap of several terabytes per month, they’re not going to cut you off unless you’re using an absurd amount of data.
  4. “No restrictions”-This means that your ISP will give you the same quality regardless of where you are or what time it is. For example, if it says “no restrictions,” then even though there might be a data cap of several terabytes per month, your ISP won’t throttle you or cut off your internet simply because you used more than their limit. However, an ISP can still slow down your speeds if there’s too much traffic on the network when it’s very busy (which is called throttling).
  5. “Unlimited data”-It sounds nice to have an ISP promise you “unlimited data,” but what can be more misleading is when they advertise “unlimited” speeds. If your ISP tells you that there are no speed caps, then it’s probably best to assume that the speeds are capped-no matter how much you pay. That being said, if you’re paying for a high-speed connection and you’re not getting what you were promised, then it might be time to switch over to fiber optics.
  6. “Fiber internet”-When an ISP tells you that they’ve got “fiber internet,” this means that their network is built on fiber-optic cables (the same kind of cables used by telephone companies and big businesses). Fiber-optic internet is usually a lot faster than DSL and cable because the wires have a bigger bandwidth, which means they can carry more information simultaneously.
  • Up to 250 Mbps-This connection speed comes from an ISP called Tachyon communications who says that it offers “up to” 250 Mbps speeds. In other words, just because they’re promising up to 250 Mbps doesn’t mean that you’re guaranteed to get exactly that. This is the same case with every ISP-you should take “up to” speeds with a grain of salt.
  • Up to 6 times faster than basic broadband- This comes from PTCL’s website, but the company only promises that you’ll get “up to” 6 times faster than basic broadband, not exactly six times. This is still a pretty good deal if you’re getting significantly better speeds for only slightly more money.
  • Up to 50,, Mbps-Time Warner Cable promises up to 25 Mbps in some areas and up to 50 Mbps in others (which means you might not get either). Depending on your location, you might be able to get a better connection speed for a similar price, so it’s worth doing some research.
  • Up to 100 Mbps-This is what AT&T advertises as their internet speeds (even though their website doesn’t promise any specific maximum download/upload speeds), which isn’t bad, but there are better ISPs out there.
  • Up to 300 Mbps-This is what Verizon advertises as their internet speeds (even though it guarantees up to 200 Mbps in some areas), which isn’t bad at all! Keep in mind that the speed you’ll get will depend on your location.
  • Up to 1 Gbps-This is probably the maximum speed you’ll find advertised, although it’s only available to certain areas. For example, this max speed is what Xfinity promotes as its speeds (even though they guarantee up to 250 Mbps in most areas), and it’s also what Google Fiber promises (although their service varies depending on location).
  • Up to 40 Mbps-Cable ONE says that their connection speed is up to 40 Mbps, but it’s worth noting that the service often falls short of these speeds due to traffic and other technical issues.
READ THIS  How Does Fiber Optic Internet Work?

 

How did you like the article?
lndustry insights delivered to your inbox weekly
Share on twitter
Share on facebook
Share on linkedin

How Does Fiber Optic Internet Work?

  A fiber-optic connection will be the most reliable internet option available to you because it...

What Reason Makes Businesses Get Fiber Optic Internet?

  Fiber optic internet has become a lot more prevalent in the past few years. A...

How Fiber Optic Internet Can Impact Your Life?

  Fiber optic internet can impact your life. Fiber has been the top choice for those...

how to choose a suitable cable for fiber optic?

  First of all, it is necessary to calculate the capacity required by the cable. For...

Fibre Optic Internet Toronto: What Is Fiber Optic Internet

The difficulties facing a modern world A person must keep current and well-informed on the latest...

What are the advantages of using DSL over fiber optics?

  Fiber optic internet vs. DSL internet service One advantage DSL has over fiber-optic broadband is...
Leave a Replay

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

With our solutions helping
you to save money
Want to see how We can
help you?
By clicking “Submit” you agree to our privacy policy.